Archives for category: Media

Why is this film only being shown in New York City? How can I see it? Is it on the Web? I am salivating over what I’ve read so far!

Dance and Visual Art on Film: Finite and Infinite Games
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jennifer-edwards/dance-and-visual-art-on-f_b_788067.html

Also, I hate that you have to log in to HuffPo to comment and that is why I am simply linking here.

(via Rosie’s Tumblr.)

Is this dance? Is this choregoraphy? Is this entertainment? Is this art?

I think the questions to all of the above are YES!

Now were these good ideas being created by dancers and/or choreographers? I think maybe not.

We need to get in on this quirkiness dancers – claim our art and collaborate with musicians! Let’s do this.

I really fell into puppy love with dance when I saw the high school dance team perform while I was in middle school. I knew that that was my chance to perform, but I also was in such awe with their precision. How did they get so many girls to look all the same?

That lead me to an obvious love and admiration for the Rockettes, the number one masters of precision. That lead me to writing a paper on them and the history of precision dance in college Dance History class, even while I was slowly falling into a more mature and secure with love with dance in all its forms – especially modern, contact improv and more abstract movement.

Today, my boyfriend sent me this link:

I was floored. These were the most easy to grasp, pedestrian movements. But they were done in a) an incredibly musical way, b) out of context and contrasted with the “real world” and c) in polished group precision.

We’ve been playing with walking and pedestrian movement a lot at Glade Dance Collective, but I do feel like precision is overlooked in the modern world. It’s too easy of a way to impress a Top 40 audience, or something like that.

I wonder how I can incorporate extreme precision into more of my choreography and performance. Even seasoned art critics can be blown away by precision!


Glade Dance Collective performs at the Phillips Collection.

Glade Dance Collective performs at the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C. Photo by Pink Line Project.

On Thursday, Aug. 26, I was luckily enough to perform with some members of Glade Dance Collective and drummer Names Thompson at the Pink Line Project-organized White Party at the Phillips Collection.

The White Party was one of many Phillips After 5 Thursday-night events, where drinks are served, various bands play and well-dressed guests mingle among art, artists and other good-looking people.

It was especially fun to perform at the White Party because we were integrated in the party both as guests and performers. The transitions between mingle time and dance-watching time were filled with us, in costume, simply asking for the guests to back up a little bit to watch us dance!

Sylvana Christopher Sandoz choreographed the Afro-Cuban inspired dance I was in, and it was glorious to be able to interact with the audience literally right in their faces with such a flirtatious and skirt-flipping dance. Names Thompson, our drummer (who also plays a kit for D.C. band Soul Brazil), added spice with his original music. It was such a treat to have a live musician!

The audience – artsy and chic – in a way didn’t know exactly what to do with us. The weird side of being able to dance in the audience’s faces was that I saw their reactions in exact real time.

During our first run inside the gallery, most of the reactions were somewhere between half-smiling confusion, is-it-okay-to-enjoy-this? and 75% joy.

Our second show was outside on the patio, where more drinks and mingling were happening than inside, so the reactions were more boisterous and even up to full 100% joy.

It was a fantastic evening. I plan on following all these up with related events:

  • Visiting a Phillips After 5 to see what other great artists will perform
  • Learning to samba¬†Thursday nights at Eighteenth Street Lounge with Soul Brazil and their audience
  • Attending Afro-Brazilian and Afro-Caribbean classes at Joy of Motion

See a video of our performance at the Phillips Collection – and then check out the other view and outside location!

Look at these cut, strong, ferocious, masculine (basically, just incredibly sexy) ballet dancers of the Washington Ballet.

Photography by Steve Vaccariello. Courtesy of tWB’s Facebook page.

Brooklyn Mack by Steve Vaccariello

Dylan Ward by Steve VaccarielloLuis R. Torres by Steve Vaccariello